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Corruption Stories – Part 9

November 4th, 2010 · 20 Comments

Narendra Modi’s Gujarat is a shining example of a state that has put integrity and development above everything else. And this is not just me saying it. During my travels in recent times, when I speak to people, they all unanimously hail what he has done for the state. “If only we could get Modi to run the country for 5 years….” is the common refrain.

There are probably many honest politicians, MPs, Ministers and Chief Ministers. But none symbolises honesty and results on the ground more than Modi. He has won a resounding victory recently across elections at the municipal and panchayat elections – the numbers are a revelation in the bipolar politics of the state.

India needs people like Modi to make it to the top, and then start the process of cleansing the system. It has to start at the top. Manmohan Singh could have done it, but he chose to look the other way. We cannot let another generation of politicians eat away at our society. The money that is looted away can fast-track every development project in India and deliver results in five years – bringing about the change we want and need between two elections.

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20 responses so far ↓

  • 1 vikas nehru // Nov 4, 2010 at 5:24 am

    Bad example.

    Modi can’t be forgiven for the riots. best case, he looked the other way. worst case, he was complicit.

    either way – dignity for human life, secularism are much important then corruption.

  • 2 Mohit Dalal // Nov 4, 2010 at 7:37 am

    I agree with Vikas Nehru. Dignity for human life and secularism are more important than (public) corruption.

    Let me start with the secularism first. If the definition of “secularism” is equal regard (or disregard) for all creeds with no religion privileged over another, then the state should not have separate laws for various religions, and what is more, the state should not discriminate for or against a person based on his or her creed.

    The rules that Nehru and his descendants imposed on the county do not pass that “secular” test. (I presume that you are related to the Nehrus as you do use the “Nehru” last name, at least to post a comment on this blog.)

    There is no uniform civil code in this country. What government handout you get depends on what sort of god you profess your belief in.

    Let’s move on. Dignity for human life, you say, OK. The Congress party, led by a scion of the Nehru family, namely Mr Rajiv Gandhi, engineered a pogrom on hapless Sikhs following the murder of his mother. By all accounts at least 4,000 innocent Sikhs were massacred by Congress led goons in Delhi alone.

    Rajiv Gandhi justified it. He said, “When a mighty tree falls in the forest, the ground shakes.”

    It does indeed. But trees falling in forests does not justify the engineered slaughter of innocents. So the Congress party engineered the slaughter of Sikhs and till date not one of those responsible has paid any price for their misdeeds.

    Vikas Nehru, the crimes of the Congress party are too numerous to list. They have dragged India into an abyss that will be hard for India to get out of ever. They talk a good talk about secularism and dignity for human life, but if you really examine their record, you find that they are neither concerned with dignity nor secularism.

    The Congress party had total control over India for decades, and all they have to show for it is unbelievable corruption and nepotism. (See the dictionary definition of “nepotism” and you will see that it fits the Congress party to a t.)

    Dignity for human life is awesomely important. Can the Congress party led by Nehru and his progeny claim that they did anything for human dignity?

    Are they secular? No. They pander to “minorities” because they know that they will have the loyalty of the minorities at the poll stations. It is a cosy arrangement.

    No, the Congress is neither secular nor does it have any liking for dignity for human life. On top of that, they are corrupt. The telecom spectrum scam, the CWG scam, the Adarsh housing scam, . . . the list is seemingly endless.

    So how does the Congress stack up against what Modi did for Gujarat? Not good at all.

    You have indicted Modi for Hindu-Muslim riots following the terrible crime of a Muslim mob torching innocent pilgrims. Perhaps you have insider information that the courts do not have, and know that Modi is complicit. But the courts, whose business it is to examine all available evidence, do not have what you have. Perhaps you should address the courts.

    You asserted that the effects of corruption (on, I presume, welfare of the poor) is not very corrosive. What evidence do you present? What if corruption leads to destitution and deprivation of hundreds of millions? Is it still ok to say that corruption is benign?

    I am not surprised that a Nehru will defend a Nehru (and his descendants.) But can we have a reasonable discussion on this blog based on facts, not on vague assertions?

  • 3 Krishnan // Nov 4, 2010 at 10:57 am

    I visited Ahmedabad in February 2010 and had the opportunity to talk to a few locals (including cab drivers and auto rickshaw drivers). All of them were fulsome in their praise of Modi, I have rarely seen such praise for any politician in all my travels in India. I also heard most of them say that India will be different country if he was at the helm for five years

  • 4 Mohit Dalal // Nov 4, 2010 at 11:23 am

    Krishnan,

    I have had exactly the same experience in Ahmedabad. People take pride in what the Gujarat government has done for them. Modi is capable and people know that he has made a difference.

    I am a huge supporter of Modi even though I don’t have anything to do with Gujarat. It will be a great day for India when Narendrabhai becomes the PM.

    Jai Hind.

  • 5 Piyush Ranjan // Nov 4, 2010 at 5:05 pm

    Though I do think Modi is a great administrator and visionary but we cannot just forget that by choosing him we may end up corruption but make our country very weak socially. We cannot overlook the riots. period

  • 6 INDIAN BY HEART N DEEDS // Nov 4, 2010 at 6:05 pm

    REMEMBER THESE WORDS OF WISDOM MR. MOHIT DALAL….
    “Let’s try an analogy. Whether a person is guilty of murder is a question which should be investigated on the facts of the case. It makes no difference at all whether other people have committed murders or not.

    Learn how to reason. It would also help if you stop shouting. We are not deaf and blind over here.”"

    SO IF CONGRESS HAS DONE SOMETHING WRONG DOESN’T JUSTIFIES GUJARAT RIOTS.AND IF THOSE MATTERS ARE SUB JUDICE SO ARE THE TELECOM SCAM AND THE CWG SCAM.

    REGARDING THE ECONOMIC PROGRESS I WOULD SUGGEST YOU ALL TO GO AND READ THE FACTS AND FIGURES. GUJARAT WAS ALL WAS A INDUSTRIAL N PROGRESSIVE STATE THANKS TO MOTHER NATURE AND ALL POLITICAL PARTIES. NOT ONLY MODIJI

    I HOPE IF DONE SO “” we have a reasonable discussion on this blog based on facts, not on vague assertions?”"

  • 7 Mohit Dalal // Nov 4, 2010 at 8:36 pm

    Piyush Ranjan wrote, “Though I do think Modi is a great administrator and visionary but we cannot just forget that by choosing him we may end up corruption but make our country very weak socially. ”

    Piyush, I hope you look into the current state of India. It is a divided society. The Congress has followed the tactics used by the British — pitch the Hindus against the Muslims. The Congress has consistently provoked the “minority” by inducing fear within communities. People don’t spontaneously get motivated to burn pilgrims in trains. It takes years of nursing of hatred and mistrust. The Congress did it. And then there are people like you who swallow the Congress tale hook line and sinker.

    P Chidambaram is talking of “Hindu terror”. What it does is feed Islamic terror — PC will be quoted by the Islamic world and his statements will fire up the next round of jihadis who will kill Indians down the road. PC is a traitor but I don’t think I will hear you say anything against him or the Congress.

    I don’t know if Modi had anything to do with the riots that followed the murder of pilgrims by a Muslim mob. But it was a riot — around a quarter of the victims were Hindus. Do you think little green men from Mars killed them? And the cops who died? Who killed them?

    Reading idiots like you go on and on about Modi makes one wonder if there ever were any riots in India ever. Did you know that Hindu-Muslim riots are a fairly common occurrence in India? All of them happened before Modi. Get a clue.

    Did you know that the Congress engineered the slaughter of Sikhs — and boasted about it! I don’t see you saying that Rajiv Gandhi should have been prosecuted for that.

    The hypocrisy of people like you perhaps arises out of ignorance. Perhaps it arises out of malice. Or perhaps a combination of ignorance, stupidity, and old fashioned malice.

    I am a silent reader of Rajesh Jain’s blog. If I were him, I would delete comments from people like you and CAPSLOCK retard. Perhaps he does not delete these comments to remind people that even educated Indians with internet access think like ignorant mullahs. Not all mullahs are muslims educated in madrassas — some even know english and at least pretend to have a non-muslim background.

  • 8 Anon // Nov 4, 2010 at 9:17 pm

    Mohit makes a good point — Rajesh you should delete Indian By Heart’s comment. Comments like those waste the time of your readers. It brings down the discussion tone. Thank you.

  • 9 Surti // Nov 5, 2010 at 1:31 am

    For those who think Modi was responsible for the riots, please see the following video and you will know that your thinking is based on the congresso media.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIRMR8zW0iI

  • 10 mockingbuddha // Nov 6, 2010 at 12:36 am

    I was just reading Francis Bacon quotes. Judge for yourself.

    1. Behind every great fortune there is a crime.

    2. The remedy is worse than the disease.

    3. Acorns were good till bread was found.

    4. Nothing doth more hurt in a state than that cunning men pass for wise.

    5.One of the Seven was wont to say: “That laws were like cobwebs; where the small flies were caught, and the great brake through.”

    6. Revenge is a kind of wild justice, which the more a man’s nature runs to, the more ought law to weed it out.

    7. If we do not maintain Justice, Justice will not maintain us.

    8. Men on their side must force themselves for a while to lay their notions by and begin to familiarize themselves with facts.

    9. This is certain, that a man that studieth revenge keeps his wounds green, which otherwise would heal and do well.

    10. In taking revenge, a man is but even with his enemy; but in passing it over, he is superior.

  • 11 mockingbuddha // Nov 6, 2010 at 12:48 am

    Despite my last comment, I should say that Modi, post the unpardonable crime, has been doing a good job. In Gujarat that is…*

    Rajesh is not exaggerating, I have had the same feedback in Gujarat, when I visited it last.

    The question as to if such good work wipes away earlier crimes is best answered by those who suffered from those crimes.

    My two cents…

    Despite the good job he has done, I am against Modi for PM or any such post.

    This is because like Janus, Modi has two faces, one the prospect of good governance for those who wish India to move forward, the other the prospect of retribution and revenge for those who wish to see India move backward. He fails the test therefore.

    Next candidate please!

    —————————————-

    PS: * Modi may look like an angel to Gujarat businessmen but the problem is that he looks like an angel to Hindutva crazy bums that stretch from Kashmir to Kanyakumari too. It is just that in the latter case he looks like an avenging angel.

    One remembers that the monkeys of Hindutva disbanded the good work done by the NDA during its term in government. Can Modi fare any better?

  • 12 mockingbuddha // Nov 6, 2010 at 1:12 am

    I should say that I am disappointed with Rajesh’s sense of showmanship. After all the bow wow about corruption, he reaches down and pulls a dead NM rabbit out of his hat. Kudos is the best I can say. Carry on is what I cannot say.

    I think that I noted in an earlier comment that Governance is not an engineering problem. Rajesh should take cognisance of that. He should spend more time studying the issues involved before writing about it.

    I also think that Rajesh should worry about improving things rather than wailing about problems we are already aware of. Is there any area to which he can contribute an innovative solution by himself?

    Corruption, like prostitution is an ages old issue and always rears up where local efficiencies can overcome global and systemic inefficiencies.

    Also it has both giver and taker, and it could be you and me. How many times do we take a short cut when we know it is not legal and that going legal does not make sense.

    Nothing wrong, it is the way the human brain is built, to look for a simpler way to deal with a problem.

    To root out corruption one needs to build good systems, and yet engineers know that no system is systems are perfect or can be made perfect.

    There is always some kind of give and take in the design and corruption merely takes advantage of these design cushions. Corruption is therefore in some sense, inevitable.

    As someone said, it is a kind of grease, and as long as it does not clog the system, one does not bother with it.

    Corruption is also the greatest innovator ever known, who could ever guess that there would be a stamp paper scam, hey hello, print some stamp paper, make big money.

    Yet, this has been done. The same with lotteries, as with playwin and now in kerala, plain paper translating to big money.

    Create any new system, and as hackers will, some guy is going to find a shortcut and is going to charge for it. And you and me will be willing to pay for it.

    C’mon, there are better things to talk about.

  • 13 vikas nehru // Nov 6, 2010 at 10:21 am

    Mohit

    :) … actually, you will be surprised at my response (at least I think you will be)

    > I agree with Vikas Nehru. Dignity for human life and secularism are more important than (public) corruption.

    great. good to see that we agree.

    > Let me start with the secularism first. If the definition of “secularism” is equal regard (or disregard) for all creeds with no religion privileged over another, then the state should not have separate laws for various religions, and what is more, the state should not discriminate for or against a person based on his or her creed.

    agreed. great definition. its better than most I have read.

    > The rules that Nehru and his descendants imposed on the county do not pass that “secular” test.

    I agree. one example would be: not letting any other indian other than a kashmiri buy land in kashmir.

    > (I presume that you are related to the Nehrus as you do use the “Nehru” last name, at least to post a comment on this blog.)

    I am really a Nehru. its just a last name, like any other (at least thats what I think). I am a kashmiri hindu, if it matters. And I am not related to the family of the india’s first prime minister.

    > There is no uniform civil code in this country. What government handout you get depends on what sort of god you profess your belief in.

    yup.

    > Let’s move on. Dignity for human life, you say,

    yes, i think its important. what are we as humans, if we don’t have that?

    > OK. The Congress party, led by a scion of the Nehru family, namely Mr Rajiv Gandhi, engineered a pogrom on hapless Sikhs following the murder of his mother. By all accounts at least 4,000 innocent Sikhs were massacred by Congress led goons in Delhi alone.

    it was sickening. I was in Delhi in 84, was quite young, but whenever I think back to those days, it makes me sick.

    > Rajiv Gandhi justified it. He said, “When a mighty tree falls in the forest, the ground shakes.”

    disgusting.

    > It does indeed. But trees falling in forests does not justify the engineered slaughter of innocents. So the Congress party engineered the slaughter of Sikhs and till date not one of those responsible has paid any price for their misdeeds.

    agreed.

    > Vikas Nehru, the crimes of the Congress party are too numerous to list. They have dragged India into an abyss that will be hard for India to get out of ever. They talk a good talk about secularism and dignity for human life, but if you really examine their record, you find that they are neither concerned with dignity nor secularism.

    agreed.

    > The Congress party had total control over India for decades, and all they have to show for it is unbelievable corruption and nepotism. (See the dictionary definition of “nepotism” and you will see that it fits the Congress party to a t.)

    > Dignity for human life is awesomely important. Can the Congress party led by Nehru and his progeny claim that they did anything for human dignity?

    no, they can’t.

    > Are they secular? No. They pander to “minorities” because they know that they will have the loyalty of the minorities at the poll stations. It is a cosy arrangement.

    > No, the Congress is neither secular nor does it have any liking for dignity for human life. On top of that, they are corrupt. The telecom spectrum scam, the CWG scam, the Adarsh housing scam, . . . the list is seemingly endless.

    > So how does the Congress stack up against what Modi did for Gujarat? Not good at all.

    not good at all. agreed.

    > You have indicted Modi for Hindu-Muslim riots following the terrible crime of a Muslim mob torching innocent pilgrims. Perhaps you have insider information that the courts do not have, and know that Modi is complicit. But the courts, whose business it is to examine all available evidence, do not have what you have. Perhaps you should address the courts.

    please read my post. I said: at worst, Modi is complicit. At best, he looked the other way. I think all leaders of a sceular state like India should be held to a higher standard.

    > You asserted that the effects of corruption (on, I presume, welfare of the poor) is not very corrosive.

    I didn’t say that. I said, human dignity ranks higher.

    > What evidence do you present? What if corruption leads to destitution and deprivation of hundreds of millions? Is it still ok to say that corruption is benign?

    I didn’t say that corruption is OK. I said, human dignity ranks higher (think of the pyramid of human needs – a similar analogy applies here).

    > I am not surprised that a Nehru will defend a Nehru (and his descendants.) But can we have a reasonable discussion on this blog based on facts, not on vague assertions?

    I didn’t mention nehru – neither did Rajsh’s blog and I didn’t defend Nehru.

  • 14 Atanu Dey // Nov 6, 2010 at 10:29 am

    Comments 10, 11, and 12 above by someone who calls himself (or herself) mockingbuddha are a waste of bandwidth and time.

    I am conflicted. If I address them, I accord them a status they don’t deserve. But if I ignore them, mockingbuddha may take that as a sign that he cannot be challenged. I will go with the former hoping that he will learn something.

    Comment 10 is a non sequitur. Perhaps he came across them on the web and did a cut and paste job without reference to anything. But that was just the beginning of his verbal diarrhea.

    He writes, ” . . . like Janus, Modi has two faces, one the prospect of good governance for those who wish India to move forward, the other the prospect of retribution and revenge for those who wish to see India move backward. He fails the test therefore.”

    According to mockingbuddha, Modi’s wanting to stop those who want India to “move backward” is a bad thing.

    OK, so mockingbuddha is aligned with Islamic terrorists. I suppose he also supports the Taliban, his brothers in arm who destroyed the Bamiyan Buddhas.

    Well, mockingbuddha, you get off lightly here. This is Rajesh’s blog and I though I could rip apart your silly comments, I will resist that temptation.

    But let me quote one bit of idiocy as a sample of what your comments are about.

    “Corruption is also the greatest innovator ever known, who could ever guess that there would be a stamp paper scam, hey hello, print some stamp paper, make big money.”

    That is sheer unadulterated garbage. It makes absolutely no sense. I advise you to avoid posting comments anywhere on the web.

  • 15 mockingbuddha // Nov 7, 2010 at 4:26 am

    Dear fellow readers,

    Before I start I would like to apologise to everyone here for the discussion going off base.

    This will be my only rebuttal to Atanu, and I pre-apologise for its sense of intentional non- restraint. I got to say whatever I have to say, I beg your pardons.

    atanu,

    Thanks for your restrained and cultivated response to my essay.

    I find that restraint surprising given the fact that I admitted in a different comment on this blog, that your lengthy essays at deesha on multifarious issues sound to me like the brays of an …

    Thankfully, I dip into that soup but rarely.

    What incensed me here was the fact that I gotta read the same **** that you dish out there and this time in quotes. I was really being angry with Rajesh, not with you. Anyway I apologise if it got passed on to you. Shouldn’t have, but well, one lives and learns.

    You write that my essay put you in a spot of indecision, as to whether to respond to me or not. To tell you the truth, either way, I do not think that it would have mattered. Thanks for doing the honors anyway.

    Because you pointed out what seemed to you like salient points of my rather lengthy essay, I would like to use this platform for a gentle rebuttal.

    First point, I guess that you misunderstood my quote about Janus. Let me translate that quote into plainer English for you.

    It just means that Modi looks an attractive option to both sides and for two (oppositely) different reasons.

    Janus Face One: to those who look forward to good governance, he is apt to look their savior. his good work in Gujarat, post the riots, or was it before, I cannot make out, is a case in point.

    Tell you the truth, just for the fact that Gujarat has progressed on many fronts, my kudos go to Modi. I happened to hear from impartial sources that previous Guj governments had almost screwed up the state.

    When I visited that state last, people were really appreciative of the good work he had done, and it was not industrialists alone. On that point Rajesh is right.

    In that particular sense Modi can be a savior, there is a positive attribute to him that I am compelled to admit. As you can see Atanu, Janus Face One is quite simple really, I see nothing there that will tax anyone’s brains.

    Let us move on to Janus Face Two.

    To those who want to take India back to the middle ages, that is what I meant by moving backward, in essence I was referring to the Hindutvite barking class, he looks like a savior too.

    And what kind of savior does he look like, to them ?

    I thought that my writing was pretty clear. That he looks like a avenging angel who would act on behalf of muddle headed Hindutvites.

    eRaze the Muslims, take India back to the time of Ram or Ravan or whoever is their hero, and supposedly to a time of milk and honey. That vision however is not consonant with reality.

    The primary problem with that vision is that but for the Hindutvites, no one really wants to go back. No one wants to go to war with history.

    You must have seen the entire country heave a sigh of relief at the court’s decision. There is simply no market for avenging angels. Read that line again, and again.

    And again…

    I fear that given the chance at the PM’s slot, the mad men of Hindutva would force Modi to dance to their wishes, and if he did not, would break into a dance themselves.

    Which I see as a tragedy for a modern nation poised to take the status of an economic and strategic powerhouse.

    Haven’t we had enough of such tamashas already? Putting Modi at the top would revive those issues that are better off dead. You can perhaps see why he fails the test, my test that is.

    And I hope that you understand that it is not him really, it is just what he represents or is held to represent.

    To me, he represents two sides that are rather incompatible, and hell forbid if they ever become compatible. In which case we will end up being a being a fascist state. That would be a tragedy, wouldnt that be.

    The inherent danger of fascism that comes from mixing religion and state is what bothers people like me. Once you are into it, it is too deep and difficult a well to get out of. Haven’t we seen Islamic nations get sucked into this morass. Do we need to be as stupid as them?

    The first thing that fascist leaders usually do is to hang their trumpeters, I see you as one of the early martyrs, albeit a foolish one.

    I hope at least now, you understand what it was that I set out to convey, that you understand the Janus bit and its inherent dangers clearly.

    Despite having done the explanation, it still escapes me as to how you could have misconstrued me in the first place.

    If you had read my essay carefully, you would have seen me maintain that the last NDA government did a good job, but got tarnished by the dancing devils of Hindutva.

    At least that must have given you a pointer as to what I meant by Janus. Alas, you did not, I hope you get me right this time. There must be some limit to misunderstanding, is it not.

    Atanu, I hope that you do not embarrass yourself in a public forum at least in the future, just because you are not up to date on certain things or that you plain don’t understand.

    I certainly feel underwhelmed that you chose to pick on that particular point and twisted it to suit your mis-interpretation.

    Let me clear the air a little bit more. FYI, in cultural references, being Janus or being two faced is generally considered bad. You can understand why…

    However (remember the however) being a Janus in mythology is not so bad after all, Hindutvites may take comfort in a theory that says that there is even a Janus to Lord Ganesha connection. Janus is not a nobody, he is a God.

    Here is a clear cut and paste from Wiki.

    “In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) is the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings, endings and time. His most prominent remnant in modern culture is his namesake, the month of January, which begins the new year.

    Most often he is depicted as having two heads, facing opposite directions; one head looks back at the last year while the other looks forward to the new, simultaneously into the future and the past.”

    Is Mr. Modi forced to be Janine or not?

    ————————

    Having cleared one point, let us consider another that triggered your angst, the cut and paste job.

    There is a saying in Tamil that only one snake can recognise another’s trail, I am glad that you figured out that I did a cut and paste job.

    However if you did get over that important finding of yours and take care to read through the quotes slowly and carefully, you could have arrived at the their true significance.

    The truth is that I did not intend to write a long diatribe, I just wanted to leave the quotes as a subtle protest to Rajesh, but then I could not contain myself even after writing that.

    Which led to the verbal diarrhea, an infection that I did not wantonly pursue. I am sorry to have carried the infection into these pages. Really really sorry.

    Thanks for making it clear that you understood that I was doing cut and paste. I see some hope for you, really…

    ——————

    Coming back to the corruption quote, as to it being the greatest innovator, again misunderstandings galore.

    Let me clear the air for you once more.

    I was trying to say that corruption is akin to life itself, that it is inventive, persistent, that it breeds wherever there is a stagnant pool, that it breeds wherever systems have safety factors and cushions, and that it is difficult to guess where and what its next manifestation would be.

    That it is as potent as life’s evolution and will defeat most efforts to stop it. We should rather be doing other things than acting directly on it.

    In an Indian way that is, akin to yoga and ayurveda, to keep the body healthy so that the germs can be denied play. I was really working up to that point.

    I trusted that an intelligent reader would be able to make out what I was arriving at, that a crisp remark would tell the right story.

    I can see that I was mistaken in not expanding the statement, there are readers still who can misinterpret such statements and hold them to be vacuous. I will try to be less opaque next time.

    (Atanu, the paper-money stuff was only an example, an allegory, a comic overstatement. you should have taken it for what if was. I am sure that you would have, if you could had understood it )

    ———————-

    In toto, you can see that there was nothing in my write up that should have triggered or demanded a response from you, it was misunderstanding plain and simple.

    I wonder why you had to contort yourself into such funny loops so as to make a cogent reply to my points. I hope there is no contortionist in your family tree.

    So let us forget and forgive, just a matter of misunderstanding plain and simple. Not really worthy of wordly war or oral kurukshetras. At least I will desist from continuing this assault on a poor unsuspecting victim.

    I still think that a little consideration of the finer points and some deep thought on your part would have helped you avoid such an embarrassing essay.

    My prescription for you, which I maintained in an earlier comment in this same blog, was that you should be doing more thinking before you do the writing. A short sabbatical or something of that sort, don’t you think that will help?

    To readers like me, it would be a great relief, to be spared of the crap that emanates from such essentially humble minds.

    Elsewhere, I do not remember where exactly, I remember saying that democratising writing has had the same effect on the Internet that democratising adult suffrage has had on the polity.

    It has brought men of lesser quality but of louder mouth to the fore, while it has given us reams of entertainment, it has not given us good governance.

    Many thanks for the entertainment you unfailingly deliver at deesha. I cant remember the many times I have taken a look at the headlines of your blog and could not stop ROT****FL.

    I think you should spare some time for the readers of this blog too. It will add spice to the rather bland mixture that Rajesh dishes out, and which we consume avidly.

    One more minor point….

    Please note that before one can condescend one much reach great heights. Are you sure that you have reached such a point that a decision as to whether to reply to me should create so much indecision in your mind.

    I cant say if I am flattered or disturbed that you chose to respond to me. If you think yourself so high that you have to take a decision as to respond to me, I hope this minor essay clears your head and set things right.

    I also hope that this minor altercation can be a good trigger for some good decisions on your part, like staying off from writing, doing some deep thinking, perhaps learn the Hula Hula. Or learning how the Boomerang works. I hope you emerge stronger after such a vacation, and more importantly learn to think better.

    Thanks for the response anyway, it was a fun read!

    Regards and Best wishes,

    Your own Mocking Buddha

    Good luck, and good cheer! May you emerge stronger after these difficulties of understanding and stand stronger again. My best wishes are with you.

  • 16 Piyush Ranjan // Nov 7, 2010 at 5:40 am

    @Mohit Dalal Dude you seem overly reactive! In my view people go on this mode only when they have something to hide or are lying. What’s with this deleting comment request to Rajesh! Are you afraid of discussions and counter points ? I do, however, can sympathize on your state as you may not completely understand the meaning of democracy!

    There have been many riots in India but Gujarat riot was a little peculiar as it was as if state sponsored it! Police looked the other way and government was not taking any measures for quite a few days. As somebody has said in the comment stream that modi was at best guilty of looking the other way.

    The reason why I’d not give Modi my vote because social fabric of this country is much more important than economic progress. I do not want to build my home on bones of my fellow countrymen. period.

  • 17 Mohit Dalal // Nov 7, 2010 at 6:17 am

    Piyuysh Ranjan,

    Totally off-base comments should be removed to maintain quality control. Hence my suggestion to Rajesh Jain that he should remove stupid comments.

    Regards,
    Mohit

  • 18 mockingbuddha // Nov 8, 2010 at 8:33 pm

    Sorry, got side tracked from the main topic.

    I happen to believe that corruption is one of those fashionable topics that are forever nice to talk about and make movies about, but have little relevance to everyday living.

    Unless you are running about to government offices everyday as a way to make a living, corruption butts but rarely into our daily lives.

    Think about it, how many corrupt acts did you interface with and today. I guess the answers will be low.

    When we meet it however it irritates us, but then a lot of our responses depend on our urgency and our need to get the job done.

    By nature, we are all in some sense or the other corrupt, in the sense that if a short cut is available we tend to take it. The more people do it, the more social sanction it has.

    There is of course a time when corruption becomes a kind of sticky glue that paralyses the economy and our daily interactions, and that is the time when anti corruption quips become popular, and induces the people to rage, the same kind of rage that happens when dense traffic stops you from reaching where you want to go.

    I am not condoning corruption, merely trying to understand it.

    The reason I point this out is that there are more positive things to do, than wailing on the most obvious problems that India faces, there are more issues to highlight, there are positive things that are happening, there are positive people and actions that need attention and focus by attention makers.

    All the wailing on known issues will get us nowhere, but a brief spurt of popularity and the mistaken halo that the writer is not corrupt.

    Not by any means can anyone claim that mantle, it is just that the opportunity to be corrupt, the overwhelming need to be corrupt has not manifested itself for reasons multiple.

    Why spend time on such things, why not spend on highlighting more positive attributes that are around us. Leave the stings to Tehelka and the like.

  • 19 Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay // Jan 10, 2011 at 10:05 pm

    Nearly all the communities in India, such as Bengali, are succumbed in ‘Culture of Poverty’ (a theory once introduced by an US anthropologist Oscar Lewis), irrespective of class or economic strata, lives in pavement or apartment. Nobody is really at all ashamed of the deep-rooted corruption, decaying general quality of life, worst Politico-administrat ion, immature/weak mother language, continuous absorption of common space(mental as well as physical, both). Becoming parents only by (blindfold) self-procreation, simply depriving their (the incoming children) fundamental rights of a decent, caring society. Do not ever look for any other positive alternative behaviour (values), i.e. deliberately co-parenting of those children who are born out of ignorance, real poverty. All of us are driven only by the very animal instinct. Can the Indians(Bengali) people ever be able to bring that genuine freedom (from vicious cycle of ‘poverty’) in their own life/attitude, start themselves ‘Production of (social)Space???, at least initiate a movement, by heart.This will definitely start cleansing operation within our politics.

  • 20 JN Rampal // Jul 3, 2013 at 9:46 am

    I guess we need to have our priorities right. If we all keep on beating our chest about secularism (there is much to be said about the secularism practiced in our country) and forget about governance efficiency, we may land up being the secular backwards. We need both and one is not exchangeable for the other. (We need many other things too, e.g. eradication of corruption, equitable growth etc). At the moment India needs growth and economic prosperity unless we want to get to the bottom of every table (we are in the lowest quarter and going down). What would you do with secularism if you have no jobs, drinking water or food to eat. For the sake of future generations, let us get our priorities right.
    JNR

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