Alternate Domain Name System Idea

Robert Cringely has some ideas from David Harrison:

The Inet DNS Filter would operate for a transition period. During this time, any reputable domain name holder owning an Internet domain could ask for free registration of those same domains on the Inet system. Their site would be checked to see that it complies with Inet’s Terms and Conditions, and if so, they get it. After an initial year, they must re-register for a 5-year period. This costs a nominal fee for private individuals, and a slightly larger fee for commercial entities. When you register a trademark as a domain on Inet, you automatically get all of the global alternatives in one go. So when Wal-Mart registers walmart.com, they’d get all the similar domains automatically. But no one can block critique sites that include a trademark name within them, so if Wal-Mart had upset a customer, and that customer set up www.walmartstinks.com, Wal-Mart could not block it under the rules. Domain squatting would not be permitted, either.

Domain dispute resolution would be rapid: one week for evidence presentation, 24 hours to decide, and 24 hours for appeals. At which point the Inet DNS system would block the loser. Domain transfers would be fast and low cost. All domain activity would operate through Inet, not be farmed out to resellers, since the system is too important, and has proved to be difficult to police on the Internet. Inet domain holders would be expected to maintain control over the content of their users on sites with Inet domain registrations. Repeated failures to rapidly do so would result in the temporary or permanent loss of their Inet domain.

WiMax

The Economist writes:

Even as mobile operators start to upgrade their networks to the latest enhanced third-generation (3G) equipment, WiMax boosters say their technology is superior. Now that WiMax networks are starting to pop up around the world, the industry will soon find out if they are right.

A survey by Pyramid Research, a consultancy, found that 78% of telecoms operators are considering an investment in WiMax this year. More than 200 operators around the world are preparing to deploy WiMax or have begun trials, says TeleGeography, a market-research firm. The few previous WiMax deployments provided a poor test, since they used an early variant of the technology that works only with stationary devices; but now mobile WiMax standards have been agreed and the first products will soon be available.

Wise and Smart

Paul Graham writes:

“Wise” and “smart” are both ways of saying someone knows what to do. The difference is that “wise” means one has a high average outcome across all situations, and “smart” means one does spectacularly well in a few. That is, if you had a graph in which the x axis represented situations and the y axis the outcome, the graph of the wise person would be high overall, and the graph of the smart person would have high peaks.

The distinction is similar to the rule that one should judge talent at its best and character at its worst. Except you judge intelligence at its best, and wisdom by its average. That’s how the two are related: they’re the two different senses in which the same curve can be high.

So a wise person knows what to do in most situations, while a smart person knows what to do in situations where few others could.