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Marketing Playbook

June 19th, 2004 · 2 Comments

The Marketing Playbook is a forthcoming book [the blog]. A brief description from the authors John Zagula and Rich Tong:

Most of the time marketing -is way too complicated. One way to keep it simple is to think of it like a game. A game where you need strategy – the Marketing Play, you need intelligence about what you are up against – the Marketing Playing Field, and you need some guidelines for when you actually run down the field – the Campaign.

The Marketing Playbook idea is really just a concept or system for keeping these three elements organized and at hand. It is also the lense through which we make sense out of a lot of what we see in business out there.

It enumerates the Marketing 5 Marketing Plays:

  • Drag Race: “you pick one competitor to compare yourself to and then you put all you have into beating them across the finish line.”

  • Platform: “you generally choose to ignore the competition, or even coopt them. Instead you win by becoming a Platform from which a whole industry can win too. You win by making it easy and profitable for others to ally with you and painful for them to let you loose.”

  • Stealth: “this is almost the opposite of the Drag Race. When you run stealth you are trying to avoid getting squished by the competition. Generally you focus on a specific niche where you can build your strength unnoticed, or you peacefully coexist and even draft behind a would-be competitor. Until you have what it takes to move onto another more open and larger play.”

  • Best of Both: “Many product and services categories have both high and low end offerings – and never the twain shall meet. In Best of Both you aim to gain dominance the whole category by collapsing both high and low ends into a new more compelling offer. You winning by offering ‘your cake and eat it too.'”

  • High-Low: “this is basically the opposite of the Best of Both Play. Here, instead of offering a combination that collapses the extremes of a category, you emphasize the importance of choice. You offer both extremes, no compromises and a migration path between them.”

  • Tags: Management

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